A Metric Other Than Time

Your new hire has completed his onboarding and is now happily working. Can you finally breathe a sigh of relief?
By: | October 2, 2017 • 1 min read

So your latest new hire (the one your hiring manager was frantic to get) has signed all the required paperwork, completed his onboarding and is now happily working alongside his new colleagues. The entire process was relatively quick and hassle-free and you, the recruiter, can finally breathe a sigh of relief. Or can you?

A recent global survey of 1,100 hiring professionals by Korn Ferry’s Futurestep division finds that talent-acquisition professionals are increasingly focused on the long-term success of new hires rather than just the traditional metrics such as time-to-hire.

“Traditionally, the job of a talent-acquisition professional ended when a position was filled,” says George Vollmer, Korn Ferry Futurestep’s vice president for global accounts and strategic development. In today’s competitive hiring marketplace, he says, the focus has shifted to finding, hiring and retaining workers who can “not only succeed today, but who can also be the leaders of tomorrow.”

Quality of hire and the competition for talent were cited by talent-acquisition professionals as the top two issues that keep them up at night, the survey finds.

Although the practice of measuring recruiters via the long-term success of new hires isn’t commonplace yet, says Vollmer, he’s seeing a growing number of companies express interest in it.

“Discussions are happening today, whereas years ago it wasn’t on anyone’s radar,” he says.
Vollmer notes that he’s seeing more clients that are looking at tying an employee’s performance back to his or her recruiter and, in turn, reward that recruiter with bonuses for finding high-performing talent.

Andrew R. McIlvaine is senior editor for talent acquisition at Human Resource Executive®. He oversees coverage of talent acquisition and recruiting and also edits the weekly Recruiting Trends Bulletin e-newsletter and its associated website, RecruitingTrends.com. A Penn State graduate, Andy also spent two years in the U.S. Army prior to attending college and attained the rank of sergeant while serving in the Army Reserves. He can be reached at [email protected]

More from HRE